Happy Stitches

Keep your stitches smiling!

The PayPal Saga: Supporting Small Business? June 13, 2019

pluto

Posting cute cat photos to my social media accounts helped to save my sanity these last two weeks…

I wrote the following blog post yesterday; see update at the bottom.
I’m fit to be tied and have been pretty much out of business for the last 13 days.
Sometime in May, PayPal put a little Red Dot on my business account page. I clicked, as one would: they were looking to update my business information. I followed the link. Apparently, owing to new government  (Canadian? US?) regulations, they needed more business details than had been provided when the account was set up 14 years ago.
This didn’t seem too hard to deal with…
Little did I know!

This shouldn’t be a problem!

I looked at the list of requirements: they seemed to need confirmation that my name, address and business were all correctly associated.
The first hurdle appeared to be that the name on my PayPal account somehow read as Lucy Neatby Designs rather than the registered company name of Tradewind Knitwear Designs Inc.  No idea how it came to be that way, but that had been set up 14 years ago.
The online document listed  a list of the items that they needed. Many of them were quite personal, with confidential information that I would not normally share.
Initially, I set out to submit all the information documents requested but not the entire sheet. For example, they asked for a company bank statement with address and bank account details –  IMHO they really didn’t need to see my balance or transactions, so I submitted only the top halves of several of the sensitive documents, which included the requested address and company name, etc.
Satisfied with having now fulfilled my obligation, I moved on.

still smiling… the calm before the storm

A couple of days later I received the first (of many) emails with a subject line of “Request for Additional Information”. I called customer service; apparently they don’t accept partial documents. Every document must show all four corners of the sheet.
OK, privacy be damned! I resubmitted the full documents. A couple of days later,   another “Request for Additional Information” was sitting in the Inbox.
I had to go out of town for a week.  Upon my return, a second Red Dot had appeared, informing me that, if I didn’t comply, I might experience ‘service interruptions’.
I sent more documents and received more rejections. What points was I missing?  It was very unclear.  At least my personal profile now appeared satisfactory…
pluto2

Cats make everything better, right?…

Just after the first of June I attempted to pay my Ravelry invoice through my PayPal account and found I was not able to access the funds in my account. Consequently, I could not pay the invoice. Ravelry gives a few days grace in which to get an invoice paid, so I figured that, as soon as I got the PP issue sorted out, I would pay it.
Our sales record on-line led me to discover that our last sale had been on May 29th. Nothing since. Nor any notification from PayPal.  I was starting to receive messages on Ravelry asking why PayPal was refusing to allow my customers to make any purchases.
The enormity of the situation was beginning to reveal itself:  PayPal was holding my funds from May. They were denying all purchases, both through my website and Ravelry. As an on-line business owner, I began to realize the absolute vulnerability of my situation.

keeping calm with more cute Pluto photos

And so began my romance with the customer service department.
I would call customer service. Most of the customer service agents tried very hard to give me an explanation of what document was still needed.  I provided the documents (often duplicates of ones that had already been sent).
Every time I hung up feeling as though everything was now in place and life could commence as per usual, only to receive another banal “Request for Additional Information” 24 hours later.
To add further psychic pain, every time I rang PayPal they would let me know that I have a balance of $1472.91 in my account! That’s nice. Can’t touch it.  Apparently money in PayPal is theirs, and not yours, until you have transferred it.

Pluto, give me strength!

 After each rebuttal, I uploaded more documents, but didn’t receive any indication that they had been received or inspected.
I eventually made it to 13 customer service calls! I spoke with a number of very pleasant guys called Jason, and one *** who simply read the “Request for Additional Information” email back to me. Another one kindly gave me access to a link where I could upload multiple documents at a go.
I fell into a routine of uploading, and then calling Customer Service (I know all the codes and questions by heart now), to let them know what had just been uploaded and if there was anything else that they could suggest. I requested expedited service – this just resulted in faster rejections. Lovely.
The ninth guy I spoke with assured me that, in his opinion, all that could possibly be asked for was there, and said that if that was rejected he wouldn’t know what else to suggest. So…the next rejection read that they now needed a “- Published Annual Report, eCertificate of Corporate Status or Articles of Incorporation.”
I don’t have a published annual report; I’m not listed on the stock exchange! My accountant’s year-end report didn’t count.  I hated giving it to them, too. I sent the Corporate summary, Memorandum of Association and the last signed page of my company book.  I sent all 35 pages of it. I sent the listing on the Joint Stocks Registry.

just about ready to give up and hide away

Update on Wednesday June 12th:
After yet another call with PP Support in the morning, I was ready throw in the towel. Done. No more of this insane stress.
And then, it would seem out of nowhere by this time, within the hour of that call, what should appear to my wondering eyes but the following email:
Subject: PayPal has confirmed your identity.
  Dear Lucy Neatby,
Thank you for using PayPal. You’ve completed the procedure that helped us confirm your identity. Now you can use PayPal to receive payments.
sleepingcat

we can finally rest

Epilogue:
Last night I slept.
Today I’m feeling very grateful for all the messages of support and advice that you have all given me. Also, THANK YOU for the many of you who have generously made a purchase of a pattern or DVD, or have placed a yarn order since we have been allowed to resume business.
I feel that the PayPal treatment I received was very high-handed and arbitrary.

the KnitStars team, what a lovely bunch!

During this period, since the first Red Dot, I had a pre-arranged week away, and four days given over to working with the team from KnitStars and being filmed. These are the commitments I have to honour and give my full attention to.
I have been unable to concentrate on my preparations for an upcoming private 3 day workshop that I am to host very soon; I have made little or no progress on a new sock pattern for my Adventure Knitting gang heading up to the North West Territories next month. The Pyramid DK Blanket has made some small progress, but essentially my time has been spent fighting for my business and the folks who work with me.

back to work on the sock pattern

What stressed me out was the circular and vague nature of what PayPal were asking for.
Over the course of this saga I submitted:
  • A power bill from NS Power
  • A Canada Revenue GST statement
  • A full business bank statement
  • A full credit card bill
  • My company accounts published by my accountant
  • Proof of GST payments to Revenue Canada
  • A paid invoice from a supplier
  • A selection of documents from my lawyer relating to the incorporation of my business, including the company details and the signed pages.
  • Later on in the process, having checked with my lawyer that there was no other form of document that could be considered to be ‘Articles of Incorporation’, all 35 pages of my company book. This contains not fewer than 7 repetitions of the business address. (The subsequent PayPal response was that they needed confirmation of the business address.)
  • A printout of — and an active public link to — the Provincial Government Registry of Joint Stocks NS, documenting my incorporated business since 2002.
In return, as always, I got the phrase: “The document we received from you could not be accepted as a Business Registration document. Please provide us with a valid document.- Published Annual Report, eCertificate of Corporate Status or Articles of Incorporation.”
In the end, I purchased and obtained a Certificate of Status from the Registry of Joint Stocks NS. This was the last document I submitted. It didn’t answer the description eCertificate of Corporate status, but it was my last hope and it came good. Don’t know why.

I’m determined to keep my small business running!

This whole experience has made me very aware of the lack of regard the PayPal entity has for their customers. They are large, we are small and mostly powerless.
We are now done with this drama, and I have to move on and get caught up.
I apologize if I haven’t answered every comment (time was a scarce commodity), but we here certainly do appreciate the support you have shown us.
Happy Stitches,
Lucy
PS There is still one ominous Red Dot on my account….
beerug
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A Cautionary Tale…please share January 31, 2015

Filed under: General Musings,The Tradewinds Team — happystitches @ 14:13

You may have seen my Tweet about re-starting my new work year on Jan 26th? The visitors had gone home, family members were back to work, the laundry was even under control, and I was ready to roll. I had a long list of projects to complete and workshop notes to write. I was ready and excited to get going, with creative juices flowing swiftly. Well, the whole thing got off to a very tough start.

I collected the mail (remember those messages that come in envelopes?) from the box on Jan 5th 2015 and began working my way through the correspondence. The bombshell looked every bit  like a mass marketing letter. I opened it, and the world changed colour. (It makes me feel ill writing this even now.)

To preface what follows: At Tradewind Knitwear Designs we totally support copyright rules and policies, obey them, and will support those whose copyrights have been violated.

It was a letter from gettyimages in Seattle, dated Dec 24th 2014: Unauthorized Use Notification ‘copyright infringement’… This was followed by  7 sides more of verbiage that I found very intimidating and a demand for $910 in settlement for the unlicensed use of one of their images from mid Nov 14.

That’s is HUGE sum for the inadvertent use of a picture of a pile of parcels for 6 weeks.

They included a screen shot of our home page, showing the image that they claimed to be theirs. Yes, we had used an  image which we believed to be free of copyright.

I’m shaking even now. I’d rather not relive this, but I feel it is important. There is a lesson here!

We IMMEDIATELY removed the offending picture as instructed. We made sure it was removed from our server as well. We began researching on line. I have only ever used pictures taken by one of the Tradewinds team or paid for and taken by Hillary for us, but in prettying up the home page News box Stephanie had in all innocence found an image on the Internet on a page of Google images–of a pile of parcels–and used it. (Please note, this is not in any way a criticism of our wonderful Stephanie. There are things that she should have been told, and wasn’t.)

There was no indication of any copyright – no watermark, no text; we’ve clicked on it exhaustively since and can find nothing. I failed to pick up on this stray picture (the buck stops here), and it sailed under our radar and onto the home page in mid – late November 2014. So here we had someone demanding money for this.

Did they really have any rights to it? How could we check? It smelled very like a scam. We searched on the company’s website high and low and couldn’t find the image. I even in desperation checked with our US lawyer for her opinion on this situation. “this is horrible, but it is legitimate.”

We called them to see if we could verify that they had the rights to this image and hopefully negotiate a lesser amount. We had used the image in all innocence and would have paid a modest penalty without argument. If their intention was to bring this to our attention and limit the length of time we accidentally used their image, surely an email notifying us to remove it with it would have done the trick and it would have saved two weeks? Even if they promised a letter to follow up the matter of compensation.

They were polite but intransigent, this was very highly valued picture and it had been used for 6 weeks and although they agreed to reduce the total by a small amount, we paid in excess of $700 in the end. That is a large part of our monthly earnings. We have learned an expensive lesson.

Please be warned: there are images lying around on the Internet with hidden identifiers. Use your smartphone–take your own pictures of everything. There are web crawlers out there detecting hidden data so that the pictures can be traced. Read more about this on-line, there are many other sites that have articles too.

Be careful when a third-party uses a picture on your behalf – you are the one that would be liable. Be cautious about re-blogging. Having said that please feel free to share this, it our photo and you may share it with our blessing. To cheer you up after this miserable saga, here’s Poseidon the cat, hard at work.

Poseidon taking on the cares of the world!

Poseidon taking on the cares of the world!

 

Happy Holiday Greetings! December 24, 2014

Filed under: General Musings,home,The Tradewinds Team — happystitches @ 16:30
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Happy Holidays from all of us at Tradewind Knitwear Designs!

Happy Holidays from all of us at Tradewind Knitwear Designs!

 

Christmas Greetings from an unseasonably warm and damp  Nova Scotia!  There isn’t even a hint of ice on the lake.  As a matter of fact, if it gets much soggier, we’ll have to dig Hermione The Tractor out of the front lawn!

I’m so fortunate that our house is full of grown children, I count my blessings every time we are all gathered together.  My son was lucky to dodge some nasty weather in the far North and got a flight out of mine camp in time to join the festivities. My younger daughter is home for the holidays, as well, and we will all be under the same roof come Christmas Day.

Just before the Family Invasion and in the nick of time, I’ve drafted out the final rows of the Blossom pattern.  Now I’ll have plenty of social knitting!   I’m looking forward to sharing these next steps with my Blossom PIP Club, once they are finalized.

I hope this note finds you well, warm and in good company, with ample supplies of yarn to see you into a New Knitting Year!  Many thanks for your continued support of the Tradewinds Team!

Lucy, Stephanie, Susan, Corrie and Diane

 

 

 

Presenting Diane December 3, 2013

My name is Diane Nolet and I am Lucy’s workshop coordinator.  My function is to provide future Hosts with information they will need to offer their clients a truly remarkable learning experience in Lucy’s workshops.

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My knitting began at age 5 or so emulating my maternal grandmother and my Mom.  This fascination with knitting never saw a hiatus.  In fact, while serving in the Canadian Forces some of my Air Crew colleagues would tease me.  They wanted me to knit them a VW before we landed in Dusseldorf.

Fiesta 2

I originally bought the Fiesta Feet pattern from Kathryn Thomas at Fleece Artist and made several pairs using various yarns.

My association with Lucy began with the pattern Fiesta Feet, which I had bought from Katherine Thomas at Fleece Artist in the mid 1990’s.  Eventually, I met Lucy and Susan Hannah at the Cole Harbour Library one evening when Lucy was doing a knitting presentation with a display of her work.  That evening, I brought some of my collection of Fiesta Feet socks that I had created out of  various yarns.  Thus began my personal relationship with Lucy.

skydiamond2

Here, a friend of Lucy’s is modelling one of my Sky Diamond Hats which I test-knit for Lucy last winter

Occasionally, I test knit patterns for Lucy.  This is very much a high spot in my knitting life.  I live for a challenge and Lucy provides the opportunity with her stimulating, cutting-edge designs. Over time, I have become addicted to almost anything to do with double knitting and have enjoyed test-knitting Lucy’s DK patterns.

Recently, Lucy’s creative genius formulated a concept for a DK blanket.  This project is started in the center without a slipknot and consists of eight segments or wedges.  The project was so intriguing: when Lucy asked me if I was interested, I was over the moon! The Sunburst Blanket was, without a doubt, the largest, most intensive labour of love that I have embarked on to-date. Honestly, I was never bored while working on it and when it was complete, I even experienced some withdrawal symptoms! That was soon put to rest as Lucy had another project for me; her Igloo series of warm winter wear, hat (with two different cast ons), headband and cowl.  What fun!

sunburst

I used Kauni Effektgarn EQ-Spectrum paired with EPA-Cowichan Colours for my Sunburst Blanket,it was such an enjoyable knit! I miss working on it and now I’m looking forward to casting on my own Zinnia Blanket.

 

Introducing Susan November 8, 2013

Filed under: Adventure Knitting,General Musings,The Tradewinds Team — happystitches @ 08:07
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My name is Susan Hannah and I began working with Lucy in 1998 when my youngest son was in preschool. (He’s 6′ 7″ and several years into university now. L)

Lucy had started her fledgling business a few years earlier and I knew that, in order to continue being creative and developing new patterns and ideas, she would need help on the business side of things.  So I offered.  After some consideration, Lucy agreed, and we decided to give it a whirl at a Knit With Us event in Newfoundland.  Lucy taught some classes and I ran the sales; we both had a great time and so began our business relationship.

After a few years, Lucy asked me to help with the bookkeeping.  Her husband John had been doing it up to that point, but could no longer fit the extra work around his full-time job.  Now there was no looking back, and we worked together for many years on our own.  Over time, Corrie developed Lucy’s web presence, and we truly became an online business (more from Corrie in a later post).

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Here is my version of Lucy’s Abracadabra Scarf, knit in Celestial Merino Deep Purple. What a fun knit!

But how did a girl from the West Coast of Canada meet a girl from England and Wales?

Lucy moved to Nova Scotia in March of 1992, and I arrived less than a year later.  I always claimed that we were destined to meet and each had to move four Time Zones to do it.  We had three connection points: the Knitting Guild of Canada, where we had both placed ads looking for Knitters in the Halifax area, Shirley Scott’s Newsletter (Knitting News) and the Newcomers Club in Halifax.

My older two children fit between her younger two and, in fact, her youngest and my oldest are good friends to this day.  We became each other’s family in Nova Scotia and would celebrate various holidays together.

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Lucy and I, organizing our shipping lists. Things were very hands-on in the beginning!

But mostly Lucy and I worked together to create Tradewind Knitwear Designs (or LucyNeatby.com).

I have had many roles here:  I started out doing the shipping, then started answering e-mails and phone calls and taking on more duties.  I have packed patterns, created kits, sorted yarn, run Knit-Alongs, done the books and generally been involved on almost all levels of the business.

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I loved knitting the Cloud Stole in Celestial Merino Mango.

Last summer, I found out that I would be moving back to BC.  At first, I couldn’t tell anyone, as the plans wouldn’t be finalized before November.  My family and I had been in Nova Scotia for 20 years and we had built a life there, including this job I had created for myself.  Though I had been scaling back and we had gotten more help over the years (Stephanie had arrived on the scene by then and I could hand a large part of running the business over to her), now I had to leave completely.  I was torn– this job and my relationship with Lucy had been a big part of my life for such a long time.  Could I really do it?  Lucy and I had many emotional talks as I tried to untangle myself from the day-to-day workings of Tradewinds.

In the beginning, things had been very hands-on.  A big part of my job involved sending pattern packets, kits, yarn and DVDs to customers.  Nowadays, so much of the work can be done online, which means that certain parts of my job can, as well.  So here I am in Brentwood Bay, BC, a full continent away from Lucy, and I still work with her!  We do our accounting online (of which I’m still a big part), and I run Knit-Alongs on Ravelry.  I still help to answer some of the trickier e-mails and questions without having to step in the shop.  In the end, I’m still a part of the business, but from a distance.

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I created this version of the Fiesta Stocking after having brainstormed a few good kit options

 What were my favourite things about working with Lucy at Tradewinds?  Watching an idea grow from a small seed into an international business and knowing I was an important part of that.  Being involved with yarn–very dangerous but so much fun!  Most of all, I enjoyed the contact with customers.  I loved talking to you on the phone or working with you via e-mail to help with your choices, answer your questions, help interpret Lucy’s patterns and support you.  It was wonderful to meet many of you in person at Lucy events, especially the four Adventure Knitting trips I went on.

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I was lucky to have joined Lucy on several of her Adventure Knitting trips. Here we are, embarking on a trip to the Galapagos Islands!

Oh and the knitting!  That was our original connection, and it remains to this day.  I have knit or test-knit many of Lucy’s patterns and have enjoyed every one, even the ones I had to be talked into knitting

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I knit this Infinite Entrelac scarf for Lucy, using some of her favourite colours!

It has been a great ride and I am so grateful to Lucy for taking a risk and allowing me to go on this crazy, wonderful journey with her.

Now I’m looking forward to sharing my insight into Lucy and the business via the blog.  I’m hoping you’ll welcome different perspectives and, in turn, do your bit to make this business a better, more user friendly and fun place to be.

 

 
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